Tuesday, May 10th, 2005

Ajax Summit: Wrap up

Category: Ajax

<p>Well, the summit is over. Some people asked us going into the summit, “What exactly are you guys going to talk about? What is going to come out of the summit?” We couldn’t really answer that question then, and, now that’s over, we can’t answer it now, either.

We definitely covered a lot of issues, both from the design and development disciplines. But the event’s agenda was group-driven, and unfortunately, this group never reached anything close to concensus on what to talk about and what we wanted to achieve.

No dominant Ajax framework emerged, no plans for a unified Ajax framework were seriously entertained (whew!), no universal ajax architecture slides were produced (though we were threatened with one or two), and no “best practices” emerged.

That said, we think some great things have come out of the event. One of the biggest surprises for us was having perceptions about Macromedia’s Flash technology changed. People like David Heinemeier Hansson said things like, “If that’s what Flash does, I’m interested.” Kevin Lynch, CTO of Macromedia, explained that Flash can communicate with JavaScript bi-directionally in a browser, that it provides a solution for “secure” cross-domain consumption of web services, and that it provides a robust local cache for applications. We’ll be looking at Flash in more detail in the future, if nothing else as a bridge to these technologies for conventional Ajax applications.

It was also interesting to see how seriously web designers are taking the new features that Ajax introduces. Folks at Adaptive Path, Technorati, Flickr and other places are trying hard to gracefully introduce new ajaxian features into the applications and properties without disrupting the user experience. And they all had some good ideas about how to achieve that goal.

All in all, it was incredible to have so many influential actors from different disciplines all in the same space. How often do the creator of JavaScript, the creator of Flash, and some of the most visible users of those technologies get together to talk about where to go from here?

We all agreed to keep in touch, and it seems like this group might yet come together to do some interesting things in the space. All in all, time very well spent.

Update: Photos are up on Flickr

Scott Andrew has a nice wrapup blog entry on the summit

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Posted by Ben Galbraith at 6:56 pm
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Here’s a Greasemonkey script I wrote to help debugging of AJAXian apps in Firefox: http://blog.monstuff.com/archives/000250.html
I couldn’t find a “contact” form, so I’m posting it here, in case you’re interested.

Comment by Julien Couvreur — May 10, 2005

At Backbase we just released our vision on Rich Internet Applications: the article is called “AJAX and Beyond”.

In order to deliver a manageable and scalable RIA solution we need to go beyond the customs widgetry of the current AJAX model. At Backbase we started in 2002 to develop a new generic client-side GUI management engine (the Backbase Presentation Client) and we combined it with a declarative tag-based UI language: named BXML (Backbase eXtensible Markup Language).

The BackBase Presentation Client (BPC) is fully based on AJAX technologies, but extends it with a generic UI declaration language (BXML). It interprets the BXML tags and transforms then into the correct DOM commands, keeping full control over aspects like: layout, state, asynchronous communication, data binding, events, relationships, hierarchy and many more.
Both the Backbase Presentation Client and BXML are designed to kick-start Rich Internet Applications projects using normal HTML technologies.

For a sample applications visit: http:/www.backbase.com.

Jouk Pleiter
CEO
BACKBASE BV

Comment by Jouk Pleiter — May 12, 2005

On a post of my blog, I suggest it should be organized on a yearly basis.
It was a great experience to participate in this event.

Comment by Gustavo Muñoz — May 13, 2005

ohh I missed it… I know and like Ajax technology but missed this event. I hope it will be again in soon.

Comment by Dmitry — May 14, 2005

Just wait for a year or two. You will all forget about AJAX. Today AJAX could barely match 30% of the features of the VB, VC++ or UNIX/Motif. I have created an online technology that far exceeds VC++ or any GUI technology any one have ever seen.

Comment by Venkat — August 9, 2005

Just wait for a year or two. You will all forget about AJAX. Today AJAX could barely match 30% of the features of the VB, VC++ or UNIX/Motif. I have created an online technology that far exceeds VC++ or any GUI technology any one have ever seen.

Comment by Venkat — August 9, 2005

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