Tuesday, February 6th, 2007

Audible Ajax Episode 20: Project Tamarin

Category: Firefox, Flash, Interview, JavaScript, Podcasts

<>p>We at Ajaxian have long been hoping for a JIT compiler inside of the browsers’ JavaScript interpreter — so we were pretty stoked when Adobe donated their excellent JIT-compiling JavaScript virtual machine to Mozilla back in Nov. ’06. The new open-source codebase, maintained by the Mozilla Foundation, is known as Project Tamarin.

In this episode of Audible Ajax (~14 MB, ~27 min.), we look into Project Tamarin in a bit of detail, analyzing what kind of an impact this will have on the Ajax community. Special guests include Brendan Eich (CTO, Mozilla), Kevin Lynch (Chief Software Architect, Adobe), Alex Russell (Founder, Dojo), and more. Let us know what you think!

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Posted by Ben Galbraith at 1:58 pm
14 Comments

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4 rating from 73 votes

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I really don’t want to listen to a 27min podcast, can you please just tell me the interesting parts in a format I can read in my web browser?

Comment by Matt Nuzum — February 6, 2007

Great topic guys! Loading it now!!

Comment by Ryan Stewart — February 6, 2007

Matt: The summary is that Tamarin will probably make JS in Firefox much faster sometime in 2008 or 2009. We’ve experimented with transcripting services in the past and never been very happy with the results. However, we’ll probably try and do that again with this episode — watch for something soon.

Comment by Ben Galbraith — February 6, 2007

Anyone else having issues downloading this episode thru iTunes?

Comment by Kristofer Baxter — February 6, 2007

Great stuff! (of course it’d be nice to hear more from Brendan or the Adobe guy (Chris right? ) )

Damnit, this makes me so jealous! Must be a very fun time for moz devs right now. I’m not worried about them being able to get good coverage on js 1. It may potentially have a couple of “impure” type gate kind of things to make sure people don’t hit a path of new code previously jit’ed to a specific type already – but either way it’ll still be loads faster than js 1..

Comment by Jesse Kuhnert — February 6, 2007

Good to see that Adobe is not necessarily the giant evil corporation it’s perceived to be

Comment by Steve Boyd — February 6, 2007

Jesse: The episode featured two Chris’ (Wilson from MSFT and Fanini from Weebly.com) but the Adobe guy is Kevin Lynch :-).

Comment by Ben Galbraith — February 6, 2007

Ben: Oops.. :)

Kevin: If it’s any consolation, I’m not usually very good at getting names right even when I talk to the people attached to them almost every day.. =p (though I do internally categorize them by whatever they seem to be doing in my life – which is usually being “annoying” )

Comment by Jesse Kuhnert — February 6, 2007

I found the podcast very helpful and a welcomed differentiated medium than black on white.

Comment by Kevin — February 12, 2007

Nice job. enjoyed the information. Looking forward to the uncut conversation or extended edit. Good questions, excellent topic. The emerging Flash AJAX connection is of interest to me.

Comment by Alex Huppenthal — March 8, 2007

Are you guys still producing podcasts? I’ve found the first 20 very informative.

DW

Comment by Dan Wilson — March 14, 2007

We need a new podcast! Great work on the first 20.

Comment by Phil Strong — April 16, 2007

One question, do they mean “dialect” or “implementation” when discussing the difference between ECMAscript, Actionscript and Javascript ?

Comment by Tom Hall — May 19, 2007

I found the podcast very helpful and a welcomed differentiated medium than black on white

Comment by ed pack — September 25, 2007

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