Tuesday, October 2nd, 2007

Dojo GFX Game using SVG/VML rendering

Category: Dojo, Games

Paolo Ardoino has created a fun little web game called Be Quick Or Be Dead:

Game rendering is very simple:

  • ctx = dojox.gfx.createSurface creates 2D drawing surface
  • images, text, rectangles, … are all shapes that can be created on that surface (i.e. img = ctx.createImage(); )
  • shapes could be modified with setShape method (i.e. img.setShape(newShape); )

I hope you will enjoy Be Quick Or Be Dead, because I’m planning to code a multiplayer version :D

Be Quick Or Be Dead

Posted by Dion Almaer at 7:31 am
15 Comments

++---
2.5 rating from 39 votes

15 Comments »

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he-he, 97 points

Comment by anonymous — October 2, 2007

Kinda buggy in Firefox 2.0, and it kind of reminds me of those typing games you had to play in High School…

Overall, good effort though.

Comment by SZRimaging — October 2, 2007

Why was SVG/VML necessary for this?

Also, this game is racist.

Comment by Trevor — October 2, 2007

Oh yeah, that old gray versus green people. Why assume the green people are the primitives, and only grays have the mental capacity for magic?? No, it must be hats… this clearly discriminates against peoples who do not wear hats! Wait…. no I am wrong again!!! Clearly, the magician is wearing white pants, and it is after labor day! Oh if only I was a greenie, they have tons of friends and killer style. Could you please release a game that does not represent people who wear white pants and hats as evil magicians with no style? I am terribly offended.


…..Racist?????

Comment by Charles — October 2, 2007

The game characterizes you as a distinguished hero by having you kill hoards of identical spear-wielding antagonists. The characteristics of the latter really underscores the racialized enmity.

It’s not the only racist game by any stretch (indeed, elements of it could be found in a lot of adventure and role playing games), but it’s pretty blatant here. Mocking the observation doesn’t make the observation wrong.

And besides your first statement identifying the more rudimentary racialization, your second obviously betrays the fact that you recognize the more subtle and insidious racial undertones, as you attributed assumptions to me that I didn’t even hint at.

Comment by Trevor — October 2, 2007

Trevor, you’re reading way too far into this game, which was my point. There are no actual races in question, you’re applying stereotypes from our world into Paolo’s imaginary one, which is more racist than anything in the game, IMO.


From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kobold
Kobolds are Sprites of German folklore. The name comes from “Kobe” = house, hut and the word “hold” = comely, good (Paul Hermann, “Deutsche Mythologie”) and is often translated in English as goblin.
Magicians have been defending themselves from spirits with malicious intent (in myths, at least) since the beginning of time. Note that nowhere in the game (or wiki entry) are magicians OR kobolds designated as good or evil, because (as we all know) magicans and spirits can be either one. Interestingly enough, the D&D related Kobold entry lists the Kobolds as being the xenophobes — and I only mention this because you assume that the ‘distinguished hero’ is the one killing out of race-related fear… Which brings me to my next point:
Nowhere is the player character described as distinguished OR a hero. First of all, he’s not wearing a shirt. Not distinguished. He is wearing a lot of accessories, but that’s a personal choice, which I think just makes him look sillier. Second, he’s not defending anyone or anything but himself. Heroes are heroes because they’re saving a princess, a world, or at least defending moral values for the sake of greater good. We have no background for the characters, so in this case the magician character is defending himself from imminent death with the only skill he seems to have: making people disappear in flames by declaring their name. It’s a survival instinct, but makes him no hero. Nowhere is either the magician or kobolds declared superior. In fact, since I can’t seem to win this game, the magician seems pretty inferior to me.


Maybe the goblins want to steal the magician’s sunglasses (goblins usually hate light). Maybe the unnamed magician kills the named kobolds out of name jealousy. Maybe this is a statement on how attaching a word or name to a person objectifies them, destroying their true individuality by attempting to categorize them. — But these are all maybes, and we could go crazy (!) reading way too far into this game. Until then, I’m going to improve my typing speed until I can beat the pants off of anonymous up there.

Comment by Charles — October 2, 2007

There are no actual races in question

There are no actual races in reality either. And yet, there’s racialized stereotypes…

I only mention this because you assume that the ‘distinguished hero’ is the one killing out of race-related fear

It’s killing a bunch of indistinguishable, spear-wielding, mindless murderers.

Nowhere is the player character described as distinguished OR a hero.

The character is distinguished (and here I think you vastly misunderstood the meaning of the word), and is the protagonist. That, as far as I can tell, is the baseline definition of a hero.

Nowhere is either the magician or kobolds declared superior. In fact, since I can’t seem to win this game, the magician seems pretty inferior to me.

I’ve noticed this throughout your comments but isolated this bit because it’s the clearest example. Nowhere did I say it was anything to do with superiority. Racism is expressed in many ways, usually without any kind of “superiority” in the expression, and even sometimes in the form of complements (see Bill O’reilly’s recent remarks).

reading way too far into this game

Note, you’re the one reading into the game, not me.

Comment by Trevor — October 2, 2007

Trevor and Charles, very funny commentary you two should have a late night AM radio show.

Comment by mike miller — October 3, 2007

Why wouldn’t you just do this in flash? seriously.

nate grover

Comment by Nate Grover — October 3, 2007

hahahaha. classic!

You’re hilarious Trevor :) Very funny ;)

Comment by Gavin — October 3, 2007

Gavin,

Thanks. Why?

Comment by Trevor — October 4, 2007

Trevor, you make a solid point. But since it’s a game, it’s _essential_ that the protagonist be easily distinguishable. Also, should differences between people be taboo? If it were a triangle shooting down circles, would the game be “figurist” (or whatever), and would that be bad? Did I misunderstand your point?

Comment by Tim Cooijmans — October 4, 2007

Also, should differences between people be taboo?

No. I never meant to imply any such thing. In fact, one of my gripes is the portrayal of antagonists as indistinguishable, identical, mindless killers.

If it were a triangle shooting down circles, would the game be “figurist” (or whatever), and would that be bad? Did I misunderstand your point?

I think you might have misunderstood. I’m much more interested in the following:

– the portrayal of the antagonists with a highly racialized stereotype
– the portrayal of them as indistinguishable from one another except in terms of criteria necessary to kill them

It’s not unlike the kind of conditioning a sniper receives when training with a military.

Comment by Trevor — October 4, 2007

I think what Trevor’s main complaint is not one of racism but that he’s upset with the false dichotomy presented by the game. The protagonist must indiscriminately attack the enemy, one characterized as unforgivably evil. His issue is with the fact that the game gives the user no attempt to understand that various enemies may not be all bad and are often times forced into antagonistic roles because of societal pressures, for instance conscription, peer pressure, or from a misunderstanding stemming from propaganda.

Comment by Mulligan Madison — October 13, 2007

If anybody is interested here you could find another similar game :)
http://labs.involutive.com/game-kaboom/

Comment by Paolo — October 29, 2007

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