Friday, February 17th, 2006

Flash without Flash with Script.aculo.us

Category: JavaScript, Prototype, UI

Thomas Fuchs linked to a site that many thought was Flash, but in fact was just using Script.aculo.us.

The site is christofwagner.com and shows off portfolio of the artist.

Christof Wagner

Posted by Dion Almaer at 10:42 am
8 Comments

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3.8 rating from 29 votes

8 Comments »

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I liked it. A little slow on some of the image transitions, but overall nice. I hate Flash and sites that use Flash.

Comment by Jeremy — February 17, 2006

Wow, that completely crapped out for me. It expanded the container and then nothing, not even an error. Using a nightly of Firefox (Build 2006020904) so not sure if a bug in that, or a difference in rendering…worked fine (if a bit slow) in Camino 1.0. Interesting, at least.

Comment by Shawn — February 17, 2006

ajax is not flash

Another pretty Flash site to share with you - only that it is not done with flash but with ajax. christofwagner.com is built using the incredibly useful script.aculo.us JavaScript library. The site looks great and the work shown is brilliant. But t…

Trackback by the logfile at plasticshore.com — February 17, 2006

Hi Ajaxians, thanks for the pointer. I think, the site is pretty neat. Elegant, minimalistic and simple. Then again, it is more about art and still discussed because of its technology, which I find a little odd.

I like the pictures there, maybe because they are from the city I live and work in? :-)

René C. Kiesler

Comment by rck — February 17, 2006

That site really does look like Flash. It even has the flawed back button behavior of a Flash app! The site designer obviously doesn’t read Ajaxian.

Comment by Rufus — February 17, 2006

Absolutely unusable site (

Comment by Tony — February 17, 2006

[…] A flash-like interface but, not flash… […]

Pingback by diatribe » Blog Archive » Of Interest v20060218.1 — February 18, 2006

The point of this was to demostrate flash-like effects with ajax, but it was very slow and didn’t provide proper feedback to the user when it was loading images. The site probably worked nicely when it wasn’t under a load, but once enough people started hitting it, the time someone had to wait for an image to load went up causing a point where the app just sort a looked broken.

This is actually showing us something else important with any UI, and that’s quick feedback. You have to communicate to the user that tells them something is happenning. Just be patient. Every ajax call could potentially go off and wait forever, and you have to tell the user you’re doing something. Otherwise they think you’re code doesn’t work. Something rich client guys are very keen on. The web guys will have to learn this too.

Comment by Charlie Hubbard — February 20, 2006

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