Sunday, March 12th, 2006

Gabbly – Embedded Website Chat

Category: Chat, Showcase

<p>Gabbly (via Digg) is a new application that embeds a chat window in any web page. It seems to be based on web proxying and iframes: You think you’re looking at the target website, e.g. digg.com, but you’re actually looking at gabbly.com with an iframe for digg.com and an iframe above that for the chat window. The URL in this case is http://gabbly.com/digg.com.

The system is similar to Quek, which does something similar but with little Quek avatars running around the page. Unfortunately, it’s never been that stable.

Also, WizLite does web page annotation, but relies on either a bookmarklet or a browser extension. With both Wizlite and Gabbly, website authors can also choose to embed the special content on their pages by including some Javascript.

Posted by Michael Mahemoff at 3:23 am
29 Comments

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3.8 rating from 58 votes

29 Comments »

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Very cool idea, the chat interface does seem very cluttered though. It could also do with some kind of popular sites feature or something.

Comment by Tam Denholm — March 12, 2006

oh… sorry, now i get it! so forget my question/comment. :-}

Comment by Siegmund Führinger — March 12, 2006

Quek is as stable as it gets, as far as I know. It has been running for four years now continuously.
If anyone has stability problems using Quek, please let us know.

Comment by Lon — March 12, 2006

I can’t help but find Gabbly rather useless and annoying. I can’t really say I’ve ever been at a website before and though, “Gee, I wish I could chat with other people browsing this webiste right now… about this website.” … Most large websites (the only ones where you’d be likely to find more than one person browsing through this thing) that have ANY reason for chat or forums, already have chat or forums. Other than that, if I want to talk to people, I’ll go to the sites already designated for that.

WizLite seems useful, though. Especially in a collaborative research environment.

Comment by Josh — March 12, 2006

[...] Read the full article Technorati Tags: Ajax, Ajaxian, Chat, Web 2.0, Javascript [...]

Pingback by Ajax Lessons » Gabbly - Embedded Website Chat — March 12, 2006

This would be useful if there was some way to have notices or focus/whatever when a new guest entered a particular ‘room’ (domain?). That would make it almost the equivalent of a help-desk, with zero installation or even registration from the website integrating it. Might be a nice marketing direction for them.

Comment by Mike Ritchie — March 12, 2006

Mike: except, that only works if site owners embrace it. And as a site owner, if you wanted that sort of functionality, why not go with one of the live help chat packages out there that are specifically developed for that sort of thing and have a bunch of relevant features that this thing lacks? I just fail to see the usefulness of Gabbly… it’s a novelty… nothing more.

Comment by Josh — March 13, 2006

It isn’t usefull at all!

Comment by Tinus — March 13, 2006

Well, It was neat to play with… Except for the constant and annoying posts of avi, flash animations, and pictures, etc. To make it worse, the movies and flash would reload on EVERY post. With the ability to push these things to me, my concern is the potential for some ***hole to run code arbitrarily through the client’s browser. Any thoughts?

Comment by SokViChet — March 13, 2006

This type of serive may not seem “useful”, and it’s not actually anything new (there is a Firefox extension that does this which has been available for some time now), but this is just one more provider foreshadowing the future of the social, surfer-owned and operated internet.

The functionality of a site (and of these services) will be evolved by the users. The site creators will just put up the shell and maintain the brand while the denizens flesh out much (or most) of the content and functionality with collabrative read/write techniques and portable widgets. It’s coming.

Comment by Ryan Gahl — March 13, 2006

4th word = “service”

Comment by Ryan Gahl — March 13, 2006

If I had a ‘brochure-ware’ site, with no back-end and no technical expertise, I would definitely embrace this as a tool, since my only ‘installation’ would be to create a link on a page to the gabbly url. Right now this is just a ‘proof-of-concept’, but I can see this becoming quite mature.

Comment by Mike Ritchie — March 13, 2006

SECURITY ALERT: gabbly.com allows a bad guy to post and … tags in the chat. This is a major security hole. I alerted the gabbly guys. They said they will fix it soon.

Until they fix this you’re running a serious security risk to your machine and the network you’re on by running gabbly chats.

Comment by Jacob Levy — March 13, 2006

OK the comment sanitizer ate my comments so I’ll try to post the above without triggering him :)

The gabbly chat allows you to post Javascript script tags (in fact it allows pretty much any HTML). As I said, the gabbly guys are working on a fix.

Comment by Jacob Levy — March 13, 2006

Jacob, how can Gabbly be a security risk to your machine and/or network? They haven’t touched the digg.com code itself, obviously. The chat is running in its own iframe, there is no way the chat code can touch the site it is projected upon.
It’s just an iframe running some script… nothing to be afraid of… the worst thing that can happen is that the Gabbly chat itself is taken over by malicious script. But that script cannot escape from its iframe.
If I’m missing something please be so kind as to tell me what exactly.

Comment by Lon — March 13, 2006

[...] There are many chat applications in the market but Gabbly is different. It allows one to add chat feature to any web site without much hassle. Ajaxian.com has a detailed review of Gabbly. [...]

Pingback by A Random Pixel » Gabbly - Embedded Website Chat — March 14, 2006

Just wanted to clarify one thing. We do not proxy. Nothing other than the chat traffic goes through us. We wouldn’t have survived being dugg if we had to proxy all the users’ content through us.

Comment by Teck — March 17, 2006

Who will you be your target market and what will be your asking rate? Will this service be free?

Comment by Melanie — May 17, 2006

This is a simple one with source code :

http://www.linb.net/schat/schat.html

Comment by linb — July 21, 2006

too bad the original dev team from Gabbly is gone! The site is totally slow now if it is up at all… What to use now???

Comment by Rexmann — October 25, 2006

It seems to be based on web proxying and iframes: You think you?re looking at the target website, e.g. digg.com, but you?re actually looking at gabbly.com with an iframe for digg.com and an iframe above that for the chat window.

Comment by web design — November 10, 2006

how can i have a chat interface for my websites?

Comment by arlene — November 25, 2006

There are lot of tools available free on web that can be useful.

Comment by Mattg — January 16, 2007

yup..this site uses it..but embedded -

http://nitchi.50webs.com

Comment by nit — February 1, 2007

Here’s another completely ajax chat room that you can easily embed into your website or blog. Once inside a chat room simply copy paste the embed code into your website or blog and viola, instant chat. This chat has some other nifty social networking features and user’s don’t have to register in order to start chatting right away.

Comment by Boaz — March 5, 2007

The website for the above chat room to easily embed in your site is at http://www.livehubs.com

Comment by Boaz — March 5, 2007

Can anyone let me know how i can incorporate a chat interface on my website.

Thanks,
Gaurav

Comment by Internet Strategy India — August 28, 2007

Paul, you should use something like chatlet.net that integrates with your website and allows you to chat with your visitors, and provide online help. Chatlet.net is free.

Comment by Diana — November 13, 2007

I recommend using FlashChat, it’s a nice and complete script. we are using it right now and it works fine.

Comment by Josue Latin Freak — November 22, 2007

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