Monday, October 8th, 2007

Multi-Safari: Testing with 10 versions of Safari at once

Category: WebKit

Michel Fortin has created special versions of Safari that allow you to run them all on the same machine. This allows you to test your Ajax application in a variety of versions.

Safari normally use the Web Kit framework found inside Mac OS X to render web pages and execute javascript. This means that if you preserve an old version of Safari to run it on a newer version of Mac OS, it will use the newer Web Kit found in the system and you will get the same results as with the newer version. Thus, you would normally need a separate installation of Mac OS X for each version of Safari you want to test a website into.

These special versions of Safari use the original Web Kit framework that came with them, bundled inside the application. They will mimic original Safari rendering and javascript behaviours. HTTP requests and cookies however are still handled by the system and may not work exactly the same.

Multi Safari

Posted by Dion Almaer at 6:53 am
9 Comments

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3.1 rating from 25 votes

9 Comments »

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Don’t get too excited by this. These still do not let you run 1.x Safari in 10.4 or 2.x Safari in 10.3.

The only benefit is if you need to compare dot releases. This is a very rare need since many users will probably have Apple Software Update enabled and will already be up-to-date with their browser.

Comment by Jim — October 8, 2007

just curious – how many Safari 1.x users are in the wild?

Comment by Chris — October 8, 2007

just curious – how many Safari 1.x users are in the wild?

Less than half a percent of the market.

This is also not new. These standalones have been around for ages, and as Jim said, they don’t work where you’d want them to.

At least you can run 2.x, 3.x and WebKit side by side on 10.4.

Comment by Trevor — October 8, 2007

why waste time on this???? now lets see someone builds a testing tool that allows you to test through different versions of IE. IMO, that’s more useful. Maybe firefox too. whatever the top three or five browser is being used on the statistics is really what we need to test with.

Comment by Simon Jia — October 8, 2007

Ask. Receive.

http://browsers.evolt.org/?ie/32bit/standalone

Comment by Jim — October 8, 2007

Ask. Receive.

This is only good for testing layout. If you’re testing JavaScript behavior, you’ll need to run a completely separate OS with the version of IE that you want to test running as the primary version.

The reason being, all versions of stand alone IE will use the ‘installed’ version of IE’s JavaScript engine.

Comment by Ian — October 8, 2007

These Safari close themselves whenever it opens a URI.
-OSX 10.4.10.

Comment by chenggn — October 9, 2007

This is only good for testing layout. If you’re testing JavaScript behavior, you’ll need to run a completely separate OS with the version of IE that you want to test running as the primary version.
The reason being, all versions of stand alone IE will use the ‘installed’ version of IE’s JavaScript engine.

Unless you can prove otherwise, that’s not true. The only thing MultipleIEs has problems with by default (and it can be solved) is resolving the correct conditional comments, and possibly cookies (though I’ve only had this problem in one case).

Comment by Trevor — October 9, 2007

Trevor, have you tried IEtester? That is what you are looking for.
http://www.my-debugbar.com/wiki/IETester/HomePage
All the major versions of IE with their correct css and js engines, in a tabbed interface with some debugging.

Comment by redesigned — July 27, 2010

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