Monday, March 30th, 2009

PaperCube: Killer Way to Explore Academia

Category: Showcase

<>p>Just last week a few of us were discussing the riches that await discovery in the various computer science research paper archives and today Peter Bergström wrote in to tell us that he’s finished work on his PaperCube research paper search engine (which we mentioned when it was incomplete some time ago).

Bsaed on SproutCore, PaperCube lets you easily explore papers, including linking to references and citations–its very cool, and Peter’s prepared a video to walk through the features:

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Posted by Ben Galbraith at 10:00 am
3 Comments

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4 rating from 20 votes

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Frack me!

*WOW*

*bows down and takes hat off*
That is one *awesome* user experience

Comment by SchizoDuckie — March 30, 2009

This is really great, a very slick front-end to visualizing academic knowledge. Unfortunately, they’re using, CiteSeer, an open, but suboptimal data set, as is pointed out by the author upon visiting the page. It’s easy to imagine this being powered by a Google Scholar API back-end to
feed the slick graphical front-end. Unfortunately, a Google Scholar API does not yet exist. If it did, we would have an extraordinarily valuable resource for performing scientific research. There’s an issue open on the google-ajax-api’s project to vote for an open Google Scholar API:

http://code.google.com/p/google-ajax-apis/issues/detail?id=109

It would make apps like this one much more feasible.

Comment by otakuj462 — April 6, 2009

When I saw this, I spent a chunk of time digging around, exploring and thinking “wow I could apply this to project A and B” only to discover there is (for a working web programmer) no there there. There is nothing that can be downloaded, integrated or otherwised used. It is just a really slick demo. While my hat is off to Peter for the awesome programming, I’m seriously annoyed at ajaxian for wasting my time. You guys really need to decide what your audience is. If you’re going to stick to serving working web programmers, this type of stuff should have a warning (“here’s something that’s not available for you to use but it’s really cool”). If you’re going to become a place to publicize cool demos (for venture capitalists, angels, people needing inspiration, whatever) then become that. Don’t stand in the middle of the freeway or you’ll get smeared by the exodus as we, your audience, flees.

Comment by anonymousGuy — April 12, 2009

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