Tuesday, January 16th, 2007

Rialto: Rich toolkit platform with drag and drop

Category: JavaScript, Toolkit

>We somehow haven’t mentioned Rialto here before:

Rialto (Rich Internet Application Toolkit) is a cross browser
javascript widgets library. Because it is technology agnostic it can be
encapsulated in JSP, JSF, .Net or PHP graphic components. Nowadays it
supports pure javascript development , JSP/taglib, PHP, JSF and Python
integration. The .Net integration is on the road.
The purpose of Rialto is to ease the access to rich internet application
development to corporate developers. Ideally a Rialto developer have
neither need to write or understand DHTML, Ajax or DOM code. The target
of Rialto is corporate web applications and not internet web sites.

There is a tool to create drag and drop code, released here, and Rialto Studio is a WYSIWYG editor built in Rialto itself

Rialto

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Posted by Dion Almaer at 11:09 am
4 Comments

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Hello,

Just to mention that the url for the Rialto Studio is

http://rialto.application-servers.com/wiki/rialtostudio

Cyril Balit
Co-Developer of the Rialto Framework

Comment by Cyril Balit — January 16, 2007

I browsed the ‘quick overview’ with FF2.

I would say, a small group of essential widgets is included, they are the right choice of first things to build for a widget collection. But they don’t seem to be very polished or full featured. Some of the theme colors are so light! I almost can’t see the resize line of the splitter or the grid columns. Horizontal scrollbars were never hot, never allow those to show all over the place.

Comment by Michael van Ouwerkerk — January 16, 2007

Michael : The main difference between Backbase and Rialto is the license. Rialto is Open Source.

Comment by dgirard — January 17, 2007

@dgirard: point taken. I guess I’m a bit spoiled with all the time I get to polish my controls. Still, I think it’s worth discussing strengths and weaknesses of any toolkit, because in the end the goal is to deliver something that enables a smooth, coherent user experience. In my eyes this goal is not influenced by whether a product is open source or commercial, and I’m interested in seeing how far Ajax can go towards delivering the goods.

Comment by Michael van Ouwerkerk — January 17, 2007

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