Tuesday, August 1st, 2006

Rich Internet to Soon Replace Static Pages

Category: Articles, Web20

<p> According to the new article on the Tekrati.com site today, ZapThink is suggesting that rich internet applications based around the technologies of Ajax, Flash and Java will be replacing any and all static web sites/applications and portals.

Demand for Rich Internet Applications (RIAs) and more sophisticated user interaction is increasing dramatically, and enterprise spending on RIA applications will surpass $500 million by 2011, according to ZapThink. The analysts say enhancements to six types of business applications are helping drive RIA spending: high-transaction and event-driven Internet applications, next-generation portals, enhanced business intelligence solutions, application modernization, and Service composition or “mashup” solutions.

They talk about a report ZapThink has put out, showing that an end user experience with Ajax-enabled functionality, a nice interface, and good performance won out over a more traditional page structure. The RIA market is divided up into three submarkets looking at delivering components, environments, and extensions to help make the creation of these interfaces easier. They also mention four “primary means” of implementing these applications:

  • Adobe Flash virtual machine-based approaches
  • browser-based approaches that use JavaScript, XML, and other technologies (Ajax)
  • approaches that use Java applets or ActiveX controls
  • custom-developed Java or .NET clients

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Posted by Chris Cornutt at 8:43 am
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[...] According to Ajaxian Rich Internet will replace the static pages. This is based on the end user experience with the web 2.0 sites against the traditional static web pages. The technologies on the play would be javascript, ajax, java and .net. As they say, we too should agree “User is god!”. [...]

Pingback by DataWebTect » Blog Archive » End of static page era — August 1, 2006

My primary concerns with the majority of so-called “RIA’s” are the lack of graceful degradation and accessibility, which effectively go hand-in-hand with “search engine friendliness.”
None of the above-mentioned technologies provide indexable, searchable content to search engines like Google and Yahoo!, in and of themselves; I believe a “RIA” built on an accessible, degradable, rich HTML base however can succeed and win in both areas.

Comment by Scott Schiller — August 1, 2006

It seems to me that there will always be a need for simple static pages. Not all pieces of information are dynamic. Simple HTML is just fine for a huge number of sites. A ticket purchasing site is a good candidate for rich UI, but a more informational site doesn’t need it.

Comment by Roman — August 2, 2006

I have to agree in general with Jep and Roman. This has to be the third blurb, I’ve read recently claiming that RIA’s will replace normal static web pages. I think people fail to understand that an RIA is only good if it actually does something useful. If it doesn’t then its a pointless feature. Also as Jep pointed out the ZapThink article didn’t claim that RIA will replaces all static web pages.

Comment by Jeff Uurtamo — August 2, 2006

[...] click here to read more [...]

Pingback by » Blog Archive » Java Rich Applications — August 2, 2006

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Comment by bvi0vgda25 — August 17, 2006

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