Friday, May 7th, 2010

Spiderman Intro in CSS

Category: CSS, Examples

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It’s Friday. How about some Spiderman. In CSS using animation.

Posted by Dion Almaer at 5:00 am
6 Comments

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4.7 rating from 3 votes

6 Comments »

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That’s neat and all. But the animation quality if like Flash 4 and requires someone very well versed in CSS to pull it off. While a high school student could do the same in Flash. The ROI just doesn’t make sense yet.

Comment by gmariani — May 7, 2010

I think we can all agree to say it’s just a proof of concept so judging ROI at that point is irrelevant.

The key word here is the “yet” you put at the end. If we look back at FutureSplash and now Flash and ActionScript it’s pretty much night and day. It could be the same thing for CSS and HTML 5 as we see more and more things like the recent demo of the Aves Engine.

Comment by Over00 — May 7, 2010

I knowingly put the ‘yet’ in there, because I know at some point it will make sense to do CSS animations. But for the time being the tools aren’t there and the code is out of reach of the majority of the developers.

Comparing FutureSplash to Flash now is a difference of 10+ years. Should we expect the same delay for HTML5 to catch up to Flash in that regard? If so, I don’t see Flash going away anytime soon.

But yes, I agree it’s just a proof of concept, but it’s demo’s like this that convince clients that the technology is already here when it’s really still in it’s infancy at best.

Comment by gmariani — May 7, 2010

uhhh, isn’t this supposed to work on my iPad??

Comment by webxl — May 7, 2010

Browser detection is broken (as always). Why even webdeveloper which use newset web standard doesn’t understand this?

Comment by movax — May 8, 2010

I’m all for proofs of concept – so no knock against the author…

…But hiding/showing static images is quite different than animating. To get something that actually felt like an animation, you’d have to create a very large number of static images (12 per second is a good place to start….)

I’m all for HTML5/CSS/JS, but in a certain subset of cases (true animation, high interaction) they’ll don’t replace Flash (right tool for the job and all…).

Comment by CR4 — May 13, 2010

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