Monday, March 27th, 2006

Why Mobile Ajax will replace J2ME and XHTML

Category: Articles, Mobile

Ajit Jaokar has an opinion on platforms for mobile devices. He believes that the Ajax programming model will take on a large share of the dev mindshare in the future.

In this article he discusses:

  • The limitations of the browsing model on mobile devices and how these are being overcome
  • The impact of Ajax on mobile applications development
  • The potential of Ajax/browsing model to enable applications which target a large customer base.

Posted by Dion Almaer at 8:08 am
12 Comments

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3.6 rating from 25 votes

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One hurdle of the “Mobile Ajax” is the current lack of interaction with some of the hardware and vendor specific API’s available on mobile phones, such as GSM information, Bluetooth, etc.

Comment by Andrew Turner — March 27, 2006

I would imagine the implementations of Javascript might differ slightly from device to device (mobile, I mean,) and I like the Opera work I’ve seen – but I wonder about Flash; the PSP is said to have a mobile version of Flash coming later this year. If it’s fast, it might be a really nice cross-platform way of doing nifty things.

Comment by Scott Schiller — March 27, 2006

No one is using J2ME to build “widgetry”. Are there any examples of what he’s talking about? J2ME is used for mobile game development. Otherwise, it’s just a standard php webapp, like usual.

Comment by Ivan Lazarte — March 27, 2006

Much like FlashLite2, AJAX on mobile devices has a really long ways to go before the match up with the capabilities currently in J2ME MIDP2.0, let alone the upcoming MIDP3.0. Having developed in FlashLite2, J2ME and Opera’s mobile AJAX, I can say that IF you have the option of all 3 (Opera Mobile, FLashLite2 being poorly supported on devices at the moment) and you’re building something that doesn’t have to integrate closely with the device without hacks (fsCommand2 I’m looking your way), then yeah – perhaps it all makes sense to make the assertion that Mobile Ajax will dethrown J2ME. However I have yet to even see an AJAX person comment on that type of functionality anywhere in the browsers and AJAX platforms floating around.

Comment by Gregory — March 27, 2006

Much like FlashLite2, AJAX on mobile devices has a really long ways to go before the match up with the capabilities currently in J2ME MIDP2.0, let alone the upcoming MIDP3.0. Having developed in FlashLite2, J2ME and Opera’s mobile AJAX, I can say that IF you have the option of all 3 (Opera Mobile, FLashLite2 being poorly supported on devices at the momen)t and you’re building something that doesn’t have to integrate closely with the device without hacks (fsCommand2 I’m looking your way), then yeah – perhaps it all makes sense to make the assertion that Mobile Ajax will dethrown J2ME.

However I have yet to even see an AJAX person comment on that type of functionality anywhere in the browsers and AJAX platforms floating around.

Comment by Gregory — March 27, 2006

Much like FlashLite2, AJAX on mobile devices has a really long ways to go before the match up with the capabilities currently in J2ME MIDP2.0, let alone the upcoming MIDP3.0. Having developed in FlashLite2, J2ME and Opera’s mobile AJAX, I can say that IF you have the option of all 3 :Opera Mobile, FLashLite2 being poorly supported on devices at the moment and you’re building something that doesn’t have to integrate closely with the device without hacks, fsCommand2 I’m looking your way, then yeah – perhaps it all makes sense to make the assertion that Mobile Ajax will dethrown J2ME.

However I have yet to even see an AJAX person comment on that type of functionality anywhere in the browsers and AJAX platforms floating around.

Comment by Gregory — March 27, 2006

Much like FlashLite2, AJAX on mobile devices has a really long ways to go before the match up with the capabilities currently in J2ME MIDP2.0, let alone the upcoming MIDP3.0.

Comment by Gregory — March 27, 2006

[…] Linden Lab has been working to embed Mozilla’s gecko layout engine to not only work inside of the Second Life browser but also to allow rendering on in-world objects (see: uBrowser). This will undoubtedly unleash a wave of unpredictable creativity and applications, and also means that I can work in my virtual office without ever leaving the SL client. I’ll take phone calls with Vivox, jot down client notes in Basecamp, and record scheduled events and phone calls on Spongecell. The data will be available to every Sheep with the inherent sharing features of Web 2.0 applications. They can access the data when in their virtual office, building in Second Life and via Firefox and mobile phones when they are on the road. […]

Pingback by The Daily Graze » Second Life +is+ the Desktop — March 27, 2006

[…] Do you still think WAP is the shit or maybe that J2ME is the crusador for mobile applications? Then read this article that finally explains why ajax is much more efficient on a mobile than various J2ME products.   […]

Pingback by re:Domino » An article about why mobile ajax will replace j2me — March 28, 2006

Flame of Ajax…

Ich liebe diesen Flame of war…es hat sich über die Jahre nichts geändert.

Und das nun auch im Mobilbereich, aber, bevor Ajax sich auf dem Handy breit macht, muss erst mal das “normale Web” sich da etablieren.

Und dann wird es mit Sicherheit…

Trackback by mobinauten mobil 2.0 — March 31, 2006

I’ve written a lot of mobile applications and web applications even more and with this background, I want to contribute to your post:

I.
We’ve written one banking application in J2ME MIDP2.0, which is tested on nearly 100 devices now, and it’s one source and only one executable. So I can’t really say, that you must specialize for every phone in J2ME. And this application uses https, http, sockets, databases, canvas, custom items, xml and a lot more.

How will you do that in Ajax within the next years in a standard way and without using a properitary browser ?

The company developed a browser based banking solution before (xhtml), but the J2ME solution is a lot more accepted, at this time.

The same expierience with a train sheduling application, I’ve written. This one replaced an existing web solution.

II.
As I understood the only way to use mobile AJAX on a wide range of mobiles is to use Opera ? But why should I make my application vendor-locked when I can use an open standard like J2ME ?

J2ME is the last free and open abstraction layer on mobiles. The next layer isn’t a free, neither the browser nor the operator are allowing us to act indepent – as web developers – on a mobile.
I can tell you a lot about those web proxys in the mobile space and even a lot about Vodafone…

III.
Deployment issues aren’t a problem with MIDP 2.0. It’s so easy to install and to update (OTA) and it’s all standard now, that this isn’t an real advantage of mobile ajax today.
On the PC it’s different, but on the mobile
it isn’t…

IV.
And last but not least, what about security and Ajax ?
It’s a problem in the web nobody want’s to talk about, but on a mobile it could become even worser…

So, not to be misunderstood, I love Ajax, but I’ve developped so many years for so many plattforms and my oppinion is, mobile Ajax won’t be it within the next years, if you won’t want you app. to be vendor-locked…

Comment by Olli — April 1, 2006

Olli,

I concur with what you said. I am just speculating about the site. Since I am equally curious what they have up their sleeves. The above posting is just my speculation.

Comment by Mike Lipponen — April 3, 2006

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