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Tuesday, November 24th, 2009

Moving from the Couch to the LawnChair

Category: Database, JavaScript

We have mentioned attempts at doing Couch in the browser before, and now we have a new project. Brian LeRoux of PhoneGap/Nitobi fame, has taken a lighter couch outside as he announces Lawnchair that aims at being applicable for mobile Web usage (but can of course work anywhere else): Features micro tiny storage without the Read the rest…

Posted by Dion Almaer at 6:20 am
8 Comments

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3.2 rating from 13 votes

Monday, November 23rd, 2009

Zen Coding: Generating HTML from selectors

Category: HTML, Utility

Normally we use CSS selectors to find and tear apart HTML. Sergey Chikuyonok’s jujitsu move is to do the opposite. With Zen Coding you take a CSS selector like this: < View plain text > HTML html:xt>div#header>div#logo+ul#nav>li.item-$*5>a and it generates an HTML structure like this: < View plain text > HTML < !DOCTYPE html PUBLIC Read the rest…

Posted by Dion Almaer at 6:45 am
13 Comments

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3.2 rating from 19 votes

New SVG Web Release: Gelatinous Cube

Just in time for Thanksgiving is another SVG Web release. The SVG Web project’s tradition is to name SVG Web releases after monsters from D&D just to increase the geek factor, so in that spirit their release name this time is “Gelatinous Cube”: The Gelatinous Cube is a truly horrifying creature: A gelatinous cube looks Read the rest…

Posted by Brad Neuberg at 6:15 am
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3.9 rating from 13 votes

Friday, November 20th, 2009

Full Frontal ’09: Simon Willison on Server-Side Javascript and Node.js

Category: JavaScript, Server

Simon Willison snuck in a last-minute topic change, and is now going to give the server-side Javascript talk. The news of the past 24 hours is ChromeOS. For the first time in years, someone’s re-thinking how an OS should work. With Chrome, you turn on your computer and you’re in the browser. What’s really interesting Read the rest…

Posted by Michael Mahemoff at 12:41 pm
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3.2 rating from 34 votes

Full Frontal ’09: Jake Archibald on Performance Optimisation

Category: Performance

Jake explains no-one likes waiting, and people are multi-threaded (except when they have to sneeze). Yet, we’re stuck with a single-threaded language for the most part; and we still face the legacy of a DOM standard from another era (DOM Level 1 – 1997). This talk provides some optimisation tips, backed by Jake’s cross-browser experiments. Read the rest…

Posted by Michael Mahemoff at 12:11 pm
13 Comments

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4 rating from 25 votes

Full Frontal ’09: Todd Kloots on ARIA and Acessibility

Category: Accessibility, HTML, Usability

Todd Kloots is talking accessibility and ARIA, with examples showing how YUI nicely supports these techniques. He explains how to improve in three areas: perception, usability, discoverability. Can We Do ARIA Today? Yes. Firefox and IE (he didn’t say which version) have really good support for ARIA. And Opera, Chrome, and Safari. Likewise for the Read the rest…

Posted by Michael Mahemoff at 11:10 am
2 Comments

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3.6 rating from 21 votes

Full Frontal ’09: Stuart Langridge on HTML5 Features

Category: IE, JavaScript, Presentation

Stuart Langridge introduces us to some of the up-and-coming features we’re getting with current and future browsers, a nice complement to Robert Nyman’s talk, which covered the advanced features of “mainstream” (IE6-compatible) Javascript. After introducing the features that are there today, he also talks about how we can deal with the browser many of us Read the rest…

Posted by Michael Mahemoff at 10:52 am
1 Comment

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4.2 rating from 14 votes

Full Frontal ’09: PPK on Mobile Quirks and Practices

Category: JavaScript, Mobile

PPK talks up the excitement of mobile web development, then brings the mood down a notch by listing the overwhelming array of browsers to be targeted! Quirksmode says it all. This talk is about quirks in mobile development, and some of the solutions out there. Mobile CSS Quirks So many platforms. Take just WebKit; there’s Read the rest…

Posted by Michael Mahemoff at 7:58 am
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3.9 rating from 17 votes

Friday Fun; Scroll Clock

Category: Fun, MooTools

This is in the crazy but fun category, so I had to post this on a Friday. Toki Woki Scroll Clock: Amazing what folks do with div overflows :) All in a few lines of MooTools-used-JS: < View plain text > javascript var h1, h2, m1, m2, s1, s2; window.addEvent(‘domready’, function() {     h1=new Read the rest…

Posted by Dion Almaer at 7:35 am
7 Comments

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4.5 rating from 45 votes

Full Frontal ’09: Robert Nyman on the Javascript Language

Category: JavaScript, Presentation

Robert Nyman walks through some of the more subtle low-level features of Javascript, and some of the idioms that have emerged. Comparisons: Understanding identity (===) versus equality (==). Boolean expressions: Understanding how short-circuit logic (if a && b won’t eval b if a is false); Types: Type coercion (“1″+2+3); “falsey” (false, null, 0) versus “truthy”; Read the rest…

Posted by Michael Mahemoff at 7:06 am
4 Comments

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3.4 rating from 20 votes

Full Frontal ’09: Chris Heilmann on Javascript Security

Category: JavaScript, Security

It’s another Javascript conference! Full Frontal has kicked off in Brighton this morning (fullfrontal09 on twitter). First up is Ajaxian and Yahoo Chris Heilmann on Javascript security. The main theme is let’s use Javascript sensibly and don’t just blame the language when other things are creating the risks too. Chris walks us through the history Read the rest…

Posted by Michael Mahemoff at 6:00 am
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2.9 rating from 17 votes

Thursday, November 19th, 2009

NGiNX HTTP Push Module

Category: Comet

Even PHP developers can write web applications that use all sorts of fancy long-polling. That is what Leo said about his NGiNX HTTP push module: This module turns Nginx into an adept HTTP Push and Comet server. It takes care of all the connection juggling, and exposes a simple interface to broadcast messages to clients Read the rest…

Posted by Dion Almaer at 6:15 am
5 Comments

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3.9 rating from 33 votes

Vienna; Ruby in the browser again?

Category: Ruby

Whether you love JavaScript or not, folks are diverse and want to use a range of languages to code the client. I have played with ruby in the browser via JRuby back in the day, and there have been lots of experiments much beyond that. Adam Beynon just released Vienna and we were very excited Read the rest…

Posted by Dion Almaer at 5:17 am
2 Comments

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4 rating from 8 votes

Wednesday, November 18th, 2009

IE 9: Hardware rendering, new JS engine, CSS, standards, and more

Category: Browsers, IE

With PDC going on, we get a glimpse at the early stage of IE 9. There is some promise, albeit with omissions! Dean Hachamovitch, IE general manager, gives us an early look whirlwind that discusses: Performance Progress The JavaScript engine team members John Montgomery, Steve Lucco and Shanku Niyogi give us an early look at Read the rest…

Posted by Dion Almaer at 1:20 pm
40 Comments

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2.9 rating from 42 votes

Simply Buttons

Category: JavaScript, Library

Kevin Miller has updated his simply buttons library to use the button element. This library offers better looking and behaving buttons across all browsers. It does not need a javascript framework and is very easy to install and use. It is all the rage to build a perfect button and you can get some nice Read the rest…

Posted by Dion Almaer at 6:38 am
17 Comments

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2.3 rating from 54 votes

Tuesday, November 17th, 2009

Resource Packages; Making a faster Web via packaging

Category: Browsers, Performance

< View plain text > HTML <link rel="resource-package" href="site-resources.zip" /> What if we could agree on a simple backwards compatible approach to packaging Web resources so the browser could suck down the puppies in one go? Alexander Limi (of Plone and Firefox UX fame) has been thinking about this for awhile, and has gotten his Read the rest…

Posted by Dion Almaer at 6:23 am
20 Comments

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3.1 rating from 31 votes